THE HEAT OF THE BLUES AND THE FIRE OF THE AVANT-GARDE BLEND SUPERBLY ON THIS LANDMARK RECORDING

Florida-born saxophonist, composer, poet, actor and playwright Archie Shepp was one of the most articulate exponents of politicized black culture in the late ‘60s, a time of enormous upheaval and radical thought.

Relocating to Paris he made a number of highly influential albums, such as Blasé, that broached the essential themes of freedom and racial equality, and tapped into the bedrock of African-American music. Gospel and blues were a major part of the work, which also had a strong avant-garde sensibility. The band featured stellar vocalist Jeanne Lee and members of Art Ensemble Of Chicago. These trailblazing artists who combined jazz, poetry and radical politics made a definitive musical statement.

Blasé crosses the sacred-profane divide and liberally traveling through time and space, to create as much pre-jazz as free jazz, the tag given to Shepp for which he had much ambivalence. His artistic outlook was always broad, taking him from a graceful reprise of Duke Ellington’s Sophisticated Lady to the upbeat bustle of Touareg, a rhythmic tour de force for the Shepp-Jones-Favors trio that reflects the great inspiration Shepp drew from his appearance at the historic Pan-African festival in Algiers in July, 1969, shortly before he went into the studio to record Blasé. 

Black music has always had a fascinatingly complex relationship with its own history. Echoes of the past are continually heard in the present. What was once deemed old quickly becomes new. A song from one generation can enjoy a revival in another.

If Blasé teaches us one thing it is that younger artists have always felt the spirit of their elders in heaven and on earth. As the Duke said ‘all god’s chillun got rhythm.

“This re-mastered version of a seminal album still has great musical and emotional power...“ Kevin Le Gendre

BLASÉ

BLASÉ

Archie Shepp

Format
Regular price £26.99
Regular price Sale price £26.99
Sale Sold out

LP Information

- Limited edition
- Original 1969 BYG Records album
- 180-gram White vinyl LP
- In deluxe gatefold sleeve matte laminate varnish
- Insert featuring liner notes by Kevin Le Gendre
- Mastered to vinyl by Nick Robbins, lacquers cut by Cicely Balston at Air Studios

CD Information

- Original 1969 album
- 16-page booklet featuring sleeve notes by Kevin Le Gendre
- Digitally mastered by Nick Robbins
- Deluxe gatefold digi-sleeve with matte laminate varnish

View full details
  1. My Angel
  2. Blase
  3. There Is a Balm in Gilead
  4. Sophisticated Lady
  5. Touareg

THE HEAT OF THE BLUES AND THE FIRE OF THE AVANT-GARDE BLEND SUPERBLY ON THIS LANDMARK RECORDING

Florida-born saxophonist, composer, poet, actor and playwright Archie Shepp was one of the most articulate exponents of politicized black culture in the late ‘60s, a time of enormous upheaval and radical thought.

Relocating to Paris he made a number of highly influential albums, such as Blasé, that broached the essential themes of freedom and racial equality, and tapped into the bedrock of African-American music. Gospel and blues were a major part of the work, which also had a strong avant-garde sensibility. The band featured stellar vocalist Jeanne Lee and members of Art Ensemble Of Chicago. These trailblazing artists who combined jazz, poetry and radical politics made a definitive musical statement.

Blasé crosses the sacred-profane divide and liberally traveling through time and space, to create as much pre-jazz as free jazz, the tag given to Shepp for which he had much ambivalence. His artistic outlook was always broad, taking him from a graceful reprise of Duke Ellington’s Sophisticated Lady to the upbeat bustle of Touareg, a rhythmic tour de force for the Shepp-Jones-Favors trio that reflects the great inspiration Shepp drew from his appearance at the historic Pan-African festival in Algiers in July, 1969, shortly before he went into the studio to record Blasé. 

Black music has always had a fascinatingly complex relationship with its own history. Echoes of the past are continually heard in the present. What was once deemed old quickly becomes new. A song from one generation can enjoy a revival in another.

If Blasé teaches us one thing it is that younger artists have always felt the spirit of their elders in heaven and on earth. As the Duke said ‘all god’s chillun got rhythm.

“This re-mastered version of a seminal album still has great musical and emotional power...“ Kevin Le Gendre

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE